Treatment of pediatric multiple sclerosis, or patients younger than 18 years of age with multiple sclerosis, has not been adequately examined in randomized trials. We compared fingolimod with interferon beta-1a in this population.

In this phase 3 trial, we randomly assigned patients 10 to 17 years of age with relapsing pediatric multiple sclerosis in a 1:1 ratio to receive oral fingolimod at a dose of 0.5 mg per day (0.25 mg per day for patients with a body weight of ≤40 kg) or intramuscular interferon beta-1a at a dose of 30 μg per week for up to 2 years. The primary end point was the annualized relapse rate.

Of a total of 215 patients with pediatric multiple sclerosis, 107 were assigned to fingolimod and 108 to interferon beta-1a. The mean age of the patients was 15.3 years. Among all patients, there was a mean of 2.4 relapses during the preceding 2 years. The adjusted annualized relapse rate was 0.12 with fingolimod and 0.67 with interferon beta-1a (absolute difference, 0.55 relapses; relative difference, 82%; P<0.001). The key secondary end point of the annualized rate of new or newly enlarged lesions on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was 4.39 with fingolimod and 9.27 with interferon beta-1a (absolute difference, 4.88 lesions; relative difference, 53%; P<0.001). Adverse events, excluding relapses of pediatric multiple sclerosis, occurred in 88.8% of patients who received fingolimod and 95.3% of those who received interferon beta-1a. Serious adverse events occurred in 18 patients (16.8%) in the fingolimod group and included infection (in 4 patients) and leukopenia (in 2 patients). Six patients had convulsions. Serious adverse events occurred in 7 patients (6.5%) in the interferon beta-1a group and included infection (in 2 patients) and supraventricular tachycardia (in 1 patient).

Among patients with relapsing pediatric multiple sclerosis, fingolimod was associated with a lower rate of relapse and less accumulation of lesions on MRI over a 2-year period than interferon beta-1a but was associated with a higher rate of serious adverse events. Longer studies are required to determine the durability and safety of fingolimod in pediatric multiple sclerosis.

Adapted for dimpna.com by Paulo Bittencourt from Tanuja Chitnis, M.D. et al. for  PARADIGMS, funded by Novartis Pharma, N Engl J Med 2018; 379:1017-1027

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